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Category ArchiveHFZ capital Group

HFZ’s Laurie Golub Becomes COO at Square Mile Capital

Laurie Golub, formerly of HFZ Capital Group, will become the chief operating officer at finance and investment management firm Square Mile Capital Management, according to a press release issued by Square Mile today.  

Golub, who has more than 25 years of experience in the real estate industry, will officially start in her new role on Jan. 8.

“Square Mile has grown significantly in recent years as we’ve successfully diversified our investment strategies and capabilities,” Square Mile’s Chief Executive Officer Craig Solomon said in the release. “As we continue to execute our business plan, we believe now is the time to further enhance our already strong leadership team. Laurie’s extensive transactional background, outstanding relationships within the industry and proven business building skills make her the ideal person for this new role.”

Prior to joining Square Mile, Golub was the general counsel and COO at development and investment firm HFZ starting in 2012 and ending in July 2017, according to her Linkedin page.

She was responsible for all legal matters for HFZ and oversaw the acquisitions of numerous high-profile properties for the company’s luxury condominium projects. This includes The Chatsworth at 340-344 West 72nd Street, 11 Beach Street and 505 West 19th Street among others.

Before that she worked as general counsel and managing director of business affairs at Africa Israel USA from 2009 to 2012, as CO previously reported.

And prior to that she was an associate general counsel at Forest City Ratner Companies from 2004 to 2009. There she played a role in the pre-development of the $5 billion Atlantic Yards project and was also responsible for negotiating the acquisition of the New Jersey Nets, according to a press release from when she joined HFZ. She led the negotiations for the $400 million Barclays Center naming rights as well.

Golub got her start as an associate at Robinson Silverman Pearce Aronsohn & Berman in 1993 before moving over to Morrison Cohen Singer & Weinstein, where she represented clients involving real estate and corporate transactions.

Golub earned her law degree from New York University School of Law in 1989 and a bachelor’s degree in business and corporate communications from Boston University in 1986.

“I look forward to leveraging my background, experiences and relationships to add significant value to this exciting new growth opportunity as a senior member of the Square Mile team,” Golub said in a prepared statement.

Representatives from HFZ did not immediately respond for a request for comment.


Source: commercial

Owners Magazine 2017: Interviews with NYC’s Top Landlords

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At the risk of stating the forehead-slapping obvious, it’s been a strange 12 months.

There’s been a mixture of good and bad real estate news that can paint a picture of continued stability or darkening clouds on the horizon, depending on your point of view.

By October, the vacancy rate in all three major Manhattan markets for office space appeared to be falling, per Cushman & Wakefield data. Hundreds of thousands of square feet have been leased by Spotify, GroupM, Amazon and others. All of that is inarguably good news.

However, a year ago, few people knew that we were sitting on a retail powder keg ready to blow and take some of the biggest names in the industry with it, like Toys “R” Us, Aerosoles, Payless, Radio Shack…you get the idea. This is inarguably bad.

This is one of the reasons why it’s important to have a magazine like this one.

Yes, the data, the deals and the numbers are critical to understanding the state of real estate. But it’s also important to get a sense of what the key players are thinking right now. That’s why we asked 36 of the biggest names in the business what their vision of the market looks like.

We’ve supplemented these questionnaires with our own reported features.

Last year, New York was considered immune to the vicissitudes of the world economy because we were always a safe, stable place to park cash. That looked like less of a sure bet when China announced new outbound investment rules. Lauren Elkies Schram examines the topic in her story in this issue.

Some in the real estate community long hoped for a challenge to Mayor Bill de Blasio in this year’s mayoral election and put substantial money behind Paul Massey (one of their own) to take the reins of City Hall before that fizzled out. At the risk of propagating a Dewey-Truman blooper (we ship this magazine before Election Day), Aaron Short reported what developers are expecting and hoping for in de Blasio’s second term.

While many developers have spent the last few years touting the Far West Side of Manhattan, there is actually quite a bit of activity on the East River, something that Rey Mashayekhi examines in depth.

Finally, Liam La Guerre looked at something that’s always been written off as anathema to real estate developers: technology. It turns out, the shrewd owners are not only interested in tech, but they’re also developing their own. — Max Gross 


Source: commercial